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Cessna 182 Skylane


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The Cessna 182 Skylane is considered by many to be the very best of light airplanes. Although not produced in the same numbers as its smaller cousin the Cessna 172, and without the name recognition among the general population as the Cub, the Skylane is at the top end of what is practical for your everyday pilot.

Situated in the Cessna lineup between the 172 and 206/210, the 182 is at the top end of what can be considered a simple airplane. Although the 182 has a controllable pitch propeller, it is not pressurized and most were built with fixed landing gear and non-tubrocharged engines. You thus have the relatively simple maintenance of a 172, the extra performance of an extra 80 hp, but only a couple of extra gallons of fuel flow at cruise.

The 182 is heavier and has a more solid feel than a 172, and is widely regarded as a very good plane for instrument flying due to its stability. The newest models with a G1000 glass cockpit and GFC 700 autopilot are a true model of capability and sophistication for a light airplane.

The Cessna 182 has four seats. However, like most small planes you will only see them full for short local flights. For longer trips the extra fuel and likelihood of luggage means that one or more seats will probably go empty. What you lose in people you definitely gain in range and endurance. Later 182’s can carry 88 gallons of fuel, enough to easily remain aloft for six hours, which will exceed the endurance of the passengers if not the airplane.

Based on its price, simplicity, ease of handling, durability and performance, the Skylane has earned its place as one of the most popular and respected light aircraft.

Development

The Cessna 182 was introduced in 1956 as a tricycle gear variant of the taildragging 180. In 1957, the 182A variant was introduced along with the name Skylane. Later models have added more powerful engines and bigger windows.

In 2005, Cessna began offering the Garmin G1000 glass cockpit as an optional upgrade to the Skylane. Subsequently the glass cockpit became standard equipment.

Design

The Cessna 182 is an all-metal (mostly aluminum alloy) aircraft, although some parts – such as engine cowling nosebowl and wingtips – are made of fiberglass or thermoplastic material. Its wing has the same planform as the smaller Cessna 172 and the larger 205/206 series; however, some wing details such as flap and aileron design are the same as the 172 and are not like the 205/206 components.

Cessna 182 Type Certificate and Other Documents

Retractable Gear

The retractable gear R182 and TR182 were offered from 1978 to 1986, without and with engine turbocharging respectively. The model designation nomenclature differs from some other Cessna models with optional retractable gear. For instance the retractable version of the Cessna 172 was designated as the 172RG, whereas the retractable gear version of the Cessna 182 is the R182. Cessna gave the R182 the marketing name of "Skylane RG".

The R182 and TR182 offer 10-15% improvement in climb and cruise speeds over their fixed gear counterparts or, alternatively, 10-15% better fuel economy at the same speeds at the cost of increased maintenance costs and decreased gear robustness. The 1978 R182, has a sea level climb rate of 1140 fpm and cruising speed (75% BHP) at of 156 KTAS at standard temperature.

The landing gear retraction system in the Skylane RG uses hydraulic actuators powered by an electrically-driven pump. The system includes a gear position warning that emits an intermittent tone through the cabin speaker when the gear is in the retracted position and either the throttle is reduced below approximately 12" MAP or the flaps are extended beyond 20 degrees. In the event of a hydraulic pump failure, the landing gear may be lowered using a hand pump to pressurize the hydraulic system. There is no alternative procedure for retracting the landing gear.

Variants

182
Initial production version with fixed landing gear, four place light aircraft, powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,550 lb (1,157 kg) and certified on 2 March 1956.

182A Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 7 December 1956.

182B Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 22 August 1958.

182C Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 8 July 1959.

182D Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L piston engine, gross weight 2,650 lb (1,202 kg) and certified on 14 June 1960.

182E Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 27 June 1961.

182F Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 1 August 1962.

182G Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-L or O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 19 July 1963.

182H Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 17 September 1964.

182I
There was no "I" model built.

182J Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 20 October 1965.

182K Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 3 August 1966.

182L Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 28 July 1967.

182M Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R piston engine, gross weight 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) and certified on 19 September 1968. There was also an experimental version of this model with a full cantilever wing.

182N Skylane
Four place light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R or O-470-S piston engine, gross weight 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for take-off and 2,800 lb (1,270 kg) for landing. Certified on 17 September 1969.

182O
There was no "O" model built.

182P Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-R or O-470-S piston engine, gross weight 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) and certified on 8 October 1971.

182Q Skylane
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-U piston engine, gross weight 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) and certified on 28 July 1976.

182R
Powered by a 230 hp (172 kW) Continental O-470-U piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 29 August 1980.

182S Skylane
Powered by a fuel-injected 230 hp (172 kW) Lycoming IO-540-AB1A5 piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 3 October 1996.

182T Skylane
Powered by a fuel-injected 230 hp (172 kW) Lycoming IO-540-AB1A5 piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 23 February 2001.

R182 Skylane RG
Four place light aircraft with retractable landing gear, powered by a 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming O-540-J3C5D piston engine, gross weight 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) and certified on 7 July 1977.

T182
Four place light aircraft with fixed landing gear, powered by a turbocharged 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming 0-540-L3C5D, piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 15 August 1980.

T182T Skylane
Powered by a turbocharged and fuel-injected 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming TIO-540-AK1A piston engine, gross weight of 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) for take-off and 2,950 lb (1,338 kg) for landing. Certified on 23 February 2001.

TR182 Turbo Skylane RG
Four place light aircraft with retractable landing gear, powered by a turbocharged 235 hp (175 kW) Lycoming O-540-J3C5D piston engine, gross weight 3,100 lb (1,406 kg) and certified on 12 September 1978

Cessna 182 Pilot Reports and Buying Guides

What if you took the world’s most popular single-engine airplane and made it even better? You’d call it a new Cessna 182. Like the 172, the 182 was introduced in 1956. It offered the same ease of handling, comfort and simplicity of its little brother, the 172, but it also had more speed and better high-altitude performance. Hot-and-high performance was remarkable, mountain flying was a breeze and the aircraft offered a decent 150 mph on cross-country trips. The 182 design proved so perfect that Cessna kept the same powerplant and made only cosmetic styling changes for 30 years (1956 to 1987)... Cessna Buying Guide from Plane and Pilot